Thursday, October 25, 2007

Satellite Images of Syrian Reactor / Warehouse

Satellite images may or may not have shown that whatever the Israeli armed forces hit last month was a reactor. At any rate, there was a big building there that was within a few yards of being the same size as a reactor in North Korea, with another building on a nearby river that could be a pumping station.

Syria has refined its 'unused military building' to "largely empty military warehouse." The list of Syrian identities for what the Israeli air force blew up, updated, is now:
  • An unused military building largely empty military warehouse
  • An agricultural research station
  • Nothing but sand
  • Nothing at all: There was no raid
Meanwhile, in France, International Atomic Energy Agency director, and Nobel Peace laureate, Mohamed ElBaradei, is angry at the
  • Syrians
  • Israelis
  • foreign intelligence agencies
... because none of them told him about the Syrian nuclear program. That Syria says doesn't exist. "Frankly, I venture to hope that before people decide to bombard and use force, they will come and see us to convey their concerns." (Emphasis is mine.)

Besides, ElBaradei said, an airstrike puts efforts to contain nuclear proliferation in peril. Here's his argument: "When the Israelis destroyed Saddam Hussein's research nuclear reactor in 1981, the consequence was that Saddam Hussein pursued his program secretly. He began to establish a huge military nuclear program underground," he said. "The use of force can set things back, but it does not deal with the roots of the problem." (MSNBC, from Le Monde.)

True, to a point. But not using force doesn't seem the best idea, either.

Although you have to admit that it would be easier to:
  • Let the Bashar al-Asads and Osama bin Ladens of the world do what they want.
  • Give the Mohamed ElBaradeis clerical staffs, paper, and plenty of toner and ink cartridges.
  • Encourage panels and groups of experts to discuss why terrorism isn't the fault of the terrorists and their leaders.
  • Wait and see what gets blown up or burned away next.

2 comments:

hady alam said...

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

In the name of allah, the most beneficent, the most merciful

قل هو الله أحد

Say (o Muhammad saw) : he is allah, (the) one .

الله الصمد

Allah-us- samad ( the self-sufficient master,whom all creatures need , he neither eats nor drinks.)

لم يلد ولم يولد

"he begets not ,nor was he begotten "

ولم يكن له كفوا أحد

"and there is none co-equal or comparable unto him"

Brian, aka Nanoc, aka Norski said...

Thank you for the translation.

It's certainly better than what I did with the Arabic.

I'm no theologian, but this passage seems to be an admonition to a single, self-sufficient, supreme, uncreated God.

Since I'm a Christian: more specifically, a Catholic, I declare the existence of One God in public at least once a week. (Yes, I know about the doctrine of the Trinity - Paragraphs 222 and 253 of the Catechism of the Catholic Church are good places to start studying.)

I'm not sure what this Arabic/English comment/admonition has to do with this post, though.

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Blogroll

Note! Although I believe that these websites and blogs are useful resources for understanding the War on Terror, I do not necessarily agree with their opinions. 1 1 Given a recent misunderstanding of the phrase "useful resources," a clarification: I do not limit my reading to resources which support my views, or even to those which appear to be accurate. Reading opinions contrary to what I believed has been very useful at times: sometimes verifying my previous assumptions, sometimes encouraging me to change them.

Even resources which, in my opinion, are simply inaccurate are sometimes useful: these can give valuable insights into why some people or groups believe what they do.

In short, It is my opinion that some of the resources in this blogroll are neither accurate, nor unbiased. I do, however, believe that they are useful in understanding the War on Terror, the many versions of Islam, terrorism, and related topics.